Gabriel García Márquez’s family consider whether to publish his final novel

Originally posted on Repeating Islands:

810566-4df4fde0-c76e-11e3-b337-28333468c677

THE family of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the late Nobel literature laureate, may publish a posthumous novel, Graham Keeley report in this article for The Australian.

Garcia Marquez, the master of magical realism who brought Latin American literature to a worldwide audience, died aged 87 at his home in Mexico City on Thursday, with his wife Mercedes and two sons at his side.

His family are considering publishing a novel provisionally entitled We Will Meet in August.

It was thought to have been finished but Garcia Marquez then decided to tinker with the ending, according to friends.

The novel is about a woman, Maria Magdalena, who is 53 and every August 16 travels to a Caribbean island where her mother is buried. Though she has been happily married for years, she has an affair during one such trip and hopes that something will happen on this day every year.

In…

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Toussaint’s Memoir Translated in English

We’re appreciative of the scholarship of the Haitianist Historian Philippe R. Girard. His translation of Toussaint’s Autobiography/Memoir in the English Language is now available.
The Memoir of Toussaint Louverture (Oxford University Press, 2014) by Philippe R. Girard

Prof. Girard is also the author of

The Slaves Who Defeated Napoleon: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian War of Independence, 1801-1804  ( 2011)

Les limites politiques de la Négritude : la question de l’émancipation dans la Caraïbe

celucienljoseph:

Les limites politiques de la Négritude : la question de l’émancipation dans la Caraïbe

Originally posted on Parole En Archipel | Pour le partage du beau et du vrai:

9782343027050-0Les limites politiques de la Négritude : la question de l’émancipation dans la Caraïbe.

Par Jean-Jacques Cadet

La négritude à la limite, le récent ouvrage du poète et philosophe Jean Hérold Paul, est une critique du mouvement « noiriste ». En s’appuyant sur des figures poétiques bien connues qui ont pris naissance dans la Caraïbe, l’auteur de Je tresse mes mots (2009) montre les limites de la pensée des chantres de la négritude, mouvement qui, selon Aimé Césaire, se mit debout pour la première fois en Haïti.

L’idée de développer cette ”critique émancipatrice” a été provoquée par le séisme du 12 janvier en Haïti qui a suscité en Jean Hérold Paul un fort étonnement philosophique.

Cette rencontre de la négritude avec la thématique de la reconstruction post-séïsme pose la question majeure de l’ouvrage, celle des ”liens cachés subordonnant la poétique à la politique”. Comment penser un projet d’émancipation politique prenant en…

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A Cuba Where a Younger Generation Navigates through Stagnation and Change

Originally posted on Repeating Islands:

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PRI’s Jaimee Haddad reports on Julia Cooke’s new book The Other Side of Paradise—Life in the New Cuba [see previous post, New Book: Julia Cooke’s “The Other Side of Paradise—Life in the New Cuba”]. The book focuses on younger generations in Cuba and how they navigate through a moment of transition. Here are excerpts of the review:

It’s rare for an American citizen to spend time in Cuba. But Julia Cooke did just that. She’s a journalist and writer, and her new book “The Other Side of Paradise,” chronicles her regular visits to Cuba.

With a diverse cast of young characters, Cooke shares insights into what life is like for a new generation of Cubans.  “Young people are really plugged into Twitter and Facebook,” Cooke explains. “They are a lot more interested in the networks and the communities that they create, probably because Cuba is such a community-based…

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Call for Book Chapters for “Vodou: I Remember” Anthology

                 Call for Book Chapters
Vodou: I Remember
The Idea of Vodou in Haitian Thought, Literature, Music, and Art
edited by Celucien L. Joseph, Asselin Charles, Shallum Pierre, and Nixon S. Cleophat

Website: http://vodouirememberanthology.wordpress.com/
Deadline to submit the 300 word abstract: May 23, 3014
Complete Book Chapter Due on Friday, October 24, 2014

Vodou I Remember photo

Greetings,
Throughout Haitian history—from 18th century colonial Saint-Domingue to 21st century postcolonial Haiti—it can be said that the Afro-Haitian Religion of Vodou has been represented as an “unsettling faith” and even a “cultural paradox,” as expressed in Haitian literature, thought, law, politics, painting, music, and Haitian art. Various ideas of Vodou have emerged from each of these cultural symbols and representations, and intellectual expressions. The Vodouist discourse not only pervades every aspect of the Haitian life and experience, it has had a momentous impact on the evolution of Haitian intellectual, aesthetic, and literary imagination as well as on Haitian theological discourse. In addition, with the emergence of and great interest in Haitian studies in North America, the need to explore all dimensions of the Haitian life and writing, particularly of the Haitian religious experience in Vodou, is critical and much needed for current and future scholarship, as well as for students of culture, history, and religion.
In addition, one glaring lacuna in studies of Haitian Vodou is the scarcity of works exploring the connection between the religion and its main roots, traditional Yoruba religion. Discussions of Vodou very often seem to present the religion in vacuo, as a sui generis phenomenon that arose in Saint-Domingue and evolved in Haiti, with no antecedents. What is sorely needed then is more comparative studies of Haitian Vodou that would examine its connections to traditional Yoruba religion and thus illuminate certain aspects of its mythology, belief system, practices, and rituals.

Consequently, we would like to invite interested scholars and writers to contribute a book chapter to a new volume tentatively called Vodou: I Remember: The Idea of Vodou in Haitian Thought, Literature, Music, and Art. This anthology is interdisciplinary and transnational in nature and content. The first objective of this project is to explore how Haitian writers, artists, cultural critics, intellectuals, and theologians have imagined and engaged the Vodou religion and spirituality, and correspondingly, constructed their own ideas of the Afro-Haitian Religion. The second objective is to study comparatively the connections and relationships between Vodou and African traditional religions (i.e. traditional Yoruba religion). Such studies might enhance our understanding of the religion, and the connections between Africa and its Diaspora through shared religious patterns and practices.

The emphasis of this volume is on “the idea and representation of Vodou” and the connections between Vodou and traditional Yoruba religion. The contributor should be mindful of the transnational and transcultural perspectives of Vodou, as well as the cultural, socio-economic, and political context which gave birth to different visions and ideas of Vodou. The book is divided in five parts as follows: Part I: Vodou and Haitian intellectuals and cultural critics, Part II: Vodou and Haitian Women, Part III: Vodou and Haitian Theologians, Part IV: Vodou and Haitian art, painting, (folkloric) dance, and music (mizik rasin ["roots music"]), and Part V: Vodou and Traditional Yoruba Religion.
If you would like to contribute to this important volume, along with your CV, please submit a 300 word abstract by May 23, 2014, to celucienjoseph@gmail.com or nc2295@columbia.edu
Complete Book Chapter Due on Friday, October 24, 2014.
Successful applicants will be notified before the end of June. We are looking for original and unpublished essays for this book.

 

Potential topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) the following:
Vodou: I Remember
The Idea of Vodou in Haitian Thought, Literature, Music, and Art
edited by Celucien L. Joseph, Asselin Charles, Schallum Pierre, and Nixon S. Cleophat

 

 

Part I Vodou and Haitian Male Intellectuals and Cultural Critics
• Jean Price-Mars
• Louis Mars
• Jacques Roumain
• Dantes Bellegarde
• Justin Chrysostome (J.C.) Dorsainvil
• François Duvalier
• Louis Diaquoi
• Lorimer Denis
• Carl Brouard

• Henock Trouillot
• Jacques Stephen Alexis
• Milo Rigaud
• René Dépestre
• Frankétienne (Franck Étienne)
• Max Beauvoir
• Patrick Bellegarde-Smith
• Félix Morisseau-Leroy
• Lyonel Trouillot
• Dany Laferrière
• Claude Dauphin
• Louis Maximilien
• etc.

 

Part II Vodou and Haitian Women Intellectuals and Cultural Critics
• Marie Vieux-Chauvet
• Paulette Poujol Oriol
• Gertrude Florentine Félicitée Ida (Ida Faubert)
• Carole Demesmin
• Claudine Michel
• Edwidge Danticat
• Myriam J.A. Chancy
• Évelyne Trouillot
• Mimerose Beaubrun
• Rachel Beauvoir-Dominique
• etc.

 

Part III Vodou and Haitian Theologians
• Jean-Bertrand Aristide
• Gérard Jean-Juste
• Laënnec Hurbon
• Fritz Fontus
• Jules Casséus
• Jean Fils Aimé
• etc.

 

Part IV  Vodou and Haitian arts, painting, (folkloric) dance, (roots) music, and Haitian performers
• Boukman Eksperyans
• Boukan Ginen
• WAWA
• Rasin Kanga RAM
• Ayibobo
• Simbi
• Azor

• KOSANBA
• Hector Hyppolite
• Ulrick Jean-Pierre
• Pierrot Barra
• Georges Liautaud
• André Pierre
• Jean-Léon Destiné
• Conelia Shutt (“Ti Corn”)
• Carole Demesmin
• Emeline Michel
• Jean-Michel Basquiat
• Martha Jean-Claude
• Pétion Savain
• Farah Juste
• Carmen Brouard
• Odette Mennesson-Rigaud
• Val Jeanty
• Marie Clotilde (“Toto Bisainthe”)
• Chantal Lavigne and David Bontemps
• Werner A. Jaegerhuber
• Joseph Augustin (“Papi Djo”)
• Franck Fouché
• Rene Victor
• Lenelle Moise
• Errol Josue
• etc.

 

Part V  Vodou and Traditional Yoruba Religion
• Vodou and Traditional Yoruba Religion
• Vodou and African cosmology
• Vodou and African mythology
• Vodou and African belief systems
• Vodou and African religious practices and rituals
• Vodou and African theology
• etc.

 

We look forward to hearing from you.

 

Sincerely,
Celucien L. Joseph, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
Indian River State College
Fort Pierce, Florida

 

Schallum Pierre, Ph.D.
Research- Associate
Chercheur affilié à la Chaire d’enseignement et de recherche La philosophie dans le monde actuel de l’Université Laval
Laval University/ Université Laval

 

Asselin Charles, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English and Literature
Director of Francophone Studies
Kwara State University
Ilorin, Nigeria

 

Nixon S. Cleophat, Ph.D (c)
Columbia University
New York, New York

Contemporary Haitian Art (Sponsor and Partner)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Contemporary-Haitian-Art/116038738458039

 

 

 

 

My newly published essay: Dantes Bellegarde and the Vodou Religion

Check out my new essay:

“The Problem of and Impossibility of Vodou in the Writings of Dantes Bellegarde,”  The Journal of Pan African Studies 6:8 (March 2014):1-24.

Call for Book Chapters for “Vodou: I Remember” Anthology

Call for Book Chapters
Vodou: I Remember
The Idea of Vodou in Haitian Thought, Literature, Music, and Art
edited by Celucien L. Joseph, Asselin Charles, Shallum Pierre, and Nixon S. Cleophat
Deadline to submit the 300 word abstract: May 23, 3014
Complete Book Chapter Due on Friday, October 24, 2014

Vodou picture

 

Greetings,
Throughout Haitian history—from 18th century colonial Saint-Domingue to 21st century postcolonial Haiti—it can be said that the Afro-Haitian Religion of Vodou has been represented as an “unsettling faith” and even a “cultural paradox,” as expressed in Haitian literature, thought, law, politics, painting, music, and Haitian art.  Various ideas–sometimes conflicting– of Vodou have emerged from each of these cultural symbols and representations, and intellectual expressions. The Vodouist discourse not only pervades every aspect of the Haitian life and experience, it has had a momentous impact on the evolution of Haitian intellectual, aesthetic, and literary imagination as well as on Haitian theological discourse. In addition, with the emergence of and great interest in Haitian studies in North America, the need to explore all dimensions of the Haitian life and writing, particularly of the Haitian religious experience in Vodou, is critical and much needed for current and future scholarship, as well as for students of culture, history, and religion.

 
In addition, one glaring lacuna in studies of Haitian Vodou is the scarcity of works exploring the connection between the religion and its main roots, traditional Yoruba religion. Discussions of Vodou very often seem to present the religion in vacuo, as a sui generis phenomenon that arose in Saint-Domingue and evolved in Haiti, with no antecedents. What is sorely needed then is more comparative studies of Haitian Vodou that would examine its connections to traditional Yoruba religion and thus illuminate certain aspects of its mythology, belief system, practices, and rituals.

 
Consequently, we would like to invite interested scholars and writers to contribute a book chapter to this new anthology tentatively called Vodou: I Remember: The Idea of Vodou in Haitian Thought, Literature, Music, and Art. This project is interdisciplinary and transnational in nature and content. The first objective of this project is to explore how Haitian writers, artists, cultural critics, intellectuals, and theologians have imagined and engaged the Vodou religion and spirituality, and correspondingly, constructed their own ideas of the Afro-Haitian Religion. The second objective is to study comparatively the connections and relationships between Vodou and African traditional religions (i.e. traditional Yoruba religion). Such studies might enhance our understanding of the religion, and the connections between Africa and its Diaspora through shared religious patterns and practices.

 
The emphasis of this volume is on “the idea and representation of Vodou” and the connections between Vodou and traditional Yoruba religion. The contributor should be mindful of the transnational and transcultural perspectives of Vodou, as well as the cultural, socio-economic, and political context which gave birth to different visions and ideas of Vodou. The book is divided in five parts as follows: Part I: Vodou and Haitian intellectuals and cultural critics, Part II: Vodou and Haitian Women, Part III: Vodou and Haitian Theologians, Part IV: Vodou and Haitian art, painting, (folkloric) dance, and music (mizik rasin ["roots music"]), and Part V: Vodou and Traditional Yoruba Religion.

If you would like to contribute to this important volume, along with your CV, please submit a 300 word abstract by May 23, 2014, to celucienjoseph@gmail.com or nc2295@columbia.edu
Complete Book Chapter Due on Friday, October 24, 2014.
Successful applicants will be notified before the end of June. We are looking for original and unpublished essays for this book.

 

Potential topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) the following:

Vodou: I Remember
The Idea of Vodou in Haitian Thought, Literature, Music, and Art
edited by Celucien L. Joseph, Asselin Charles, Schallum Pierre, and Nixon S. Cleophat

 

Part I Vodou and Haitian intellectuals and Cultural Critics

• Jean Price-Mars
• Louis Mars
• Jacques Roumain
• Dantes Bellegarde
• Justin Chrysostome (J.C.) Dorsainvil
• François Duvalier
• Louis Diaquoi
• Lorimer Denis
• Carl Brouard
• Jacques Stephen Alexis
• Milo Rigaud
• René Dépestre
• Frankétienne (Franck Étienne)
• Max Beauvoir
• Patrick Bellegarde-Smith
• Félix Morisseau-Leroy
• Lyonel Trouillot
• Dany Laferrière
• Claude Dauphin
• Louis Maximilien
• etc.

Part II Vodou and Haitian Women

• Marie Vieux-Chauvet
• Paulette Poujol Oriol
• Gertrude Florentine Félicitée Ida (Ida Faubert)
• Carole Demesmin
• Claudine Michel
• Edwidge Danticat
• Myriam J.A. Chancy
• Évelyne Trouillot
• Mimerose Beaubrun
• Rachel Beauvoir-Dominique
• etc.

Part III Vodou and Haitian Theologians

• Jean-Bertrand Aristide
• Gérard Jean-Juste
• Laënnec Hurbon
• Fritz Fontus
• Jules Casséus
• Jean Fils Aimé
• etc.

Part IV: Vodou and Haitian arts, painting, (folkloric) dance, and (roots) music

• Boukman Eksperyans
• Boukan Ginen
• WAWA
• Rasin Kanga RAM
• Ayibobo
• Simbi
• Azo
• Hector Hyppolite

• Ulrick Jean-Pierre

• Pierrot Barra
• Georges Liautaud
• André Pierre
• Jean-Léon Destiné
• Conelia Shutt (“Ti Corn”)
• Carole Demesmin
• Emeline Michel
• Jean-Michel Basquiat
• Martha Jean-Claude
• Pétion Savain
• Farah Juste
• Carmen Brouard
• Odette Mennesson-Rigaud
• Val Jeanty
• Marie Clotilde (“Toto Bisainthe”)
• Chantal Lavigne and David Bontemps
• Werner A. Jaegerhuber
• Joseph Augustin (“Papi Djo”)
• Franck Fouché
• Rene Victor
• etc.

Part V : Vodou and Traditional Yoruba Religion

 
• Vodou and Traditional Yoruba Religion
• Vodou and African cosmology
• Vodou and African mythology
• Vodou and African belief systems
• Vodou and African religious practices and rituals
• Vodou and African theology
• etc.

 

 

We look forward to hearing from you.
Sincerely,

Celucien L. Joseph, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
Indian River State College
Fort Pierce, Florida

Schallum Pierre, Ph.D.
Research- Associate
Chercheur affilié à la Chaire d’enseignement et de recherche La philosophie dans le monde actuel de l’Université Laval
Laval University/ Université Laval

Asselin Charles, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English and Literature
Director of Francophone Studies
Kwara State University
Ilorin, Nigeria

Nixon S. Cleophat, Ph.D (c)
Columbia University
New York, New York

Contemporary Haitian Art (Sponsor and Partner)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Contemporary-Haitian-Art/116038738458039

 

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